Thursday, September 19, 2013

*The Addams Family*: Full of Healthy Philosophy?

One reason why I prefer being an adult over a kid is that with a stronger intellect I can deepen my appreciation and enjoyment of certain things through thinking. No such height of pleasure in kid cognition!

I recently had such an experience when I watched an analysis video by a person named Nostaglia Chick about The Addams Family. Despite the fact I grew up with, at least, the animated version, many of her insights make me look back upon it starry eyed, now.



In short, TAF may be unintentionally a work of art relaying a very healthy view of how to live your life.

Just make your own choices and indulge in the things you honestly take pleasure in, and don't fret about other people's judgments. TAF is completely eccentric in their lifestyle habits, to the point of being a unique phenomenon in their whole state (probably), but they're composed of very contented individuals that simply engage in their own interests, whether it be exploding toy trains or illuminating light bulbs orally, and it doesn't register with them emotionally to see other people's disgust or disapproval. They're not eccentric on purpose to garner such attention; they're eccentric because they don't let popular opinions determine their choices in life.

I find myself further heartened by Mortician and Gomez's marriage. In contrast to, say, The Honeymooners of the time, they're in love in incredible depth and find endless occasions to express it, and both are equal partners in raising their children.

What a good way of looking at life. The theme is stuck in my head now.

2 comments:

  1. It's interesting that you interpret it that way. ^_^

    As Lindsay Ellis said, the TV series is based on cartoons in "The New Yorker" by Charles Addams. He wasn't at all about the virtue of accepting yourself. Rather, he thought his family was weird, and he felt really ambivalent about that. He expressed that ambivalence about his family members by depicting them as ghoulish in his cartoons. The most famous one (reenacted in the beginning of the 1991 movie) is of the family on the roof of their mansion. Below them, on the ground, are a group of Christmas carolers. On the roof, the family is tilting a cauldron full of sulfuric acid. The sulfuric acid will fall onto the carolers, presumably killing them.

    The TV series was much more benevolent in tone, rather inconsistent with Charles Addams's sense of life.

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    1. Just out of curiosity, where did you get the information that the cauldron was meant to contain sulfuric acid? I am an avid appreciator of Charles Addams' cartoons, and have never seen the cauldron's contents specified.

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